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Men and women are equally as horny until they get mentally castrated

Results of a recently published study on the website of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in the United States of America (PNAS) confirm that there’s no biological difference between men and women when it comes to the way their brains respond to sexual images. As stated by professor Laan: “This research shows once again that men and women are equal in terms of sexuality. Contrary to the popular notion that men are more sexual beings than women, you can see here that male and female brains respond equally strong to visual sexual stimuli.” This confirms many of my own statements about the male and female sex drive made especially in my Understanding Women article series. The fact that we do see a strongly diminished female sex drive in societies around the world is due to the fact that especially women get mentally castrated starting from early childhood.

Here’s from “Neural substrates of sexual arousal are not sex dependent” (July 5th 2019):

Significance

Neuroimaging studies suggest differences in the underlying biology of sexual arousal associated with sex and sexual orientation, yet their findings are conflicting. Following a thorough statistical review of all significant neuroimaging studies, we offer strong quantitative evidence that the neuronal response to visual sexual stimuli, contrary to the widely accepted view, is independent of biological sex. Both men and women show increased activation in many cortical and subcortical brain regions thought to be involved in the response to visual sexual stimuli, while the limited sex differences that have been found and reported previously refer to subjective rating of the content.

Abstract

Sexual arousal is a dynamical, highly coordinated neurophysiological process that is often induced by visual stimuli. Numerous studies have proposed that the cognitive processing stage of responding to sexual stimuli is the first stage, in which sex differences occur, and the divergence between men and women has been attributed to differences in the concerted activity of neural networks. The present comprehensive metaanalysis challenges this hypothesis and provides robust quantitative evidence that the neuronal circuitries activated by visual sexual stimuli are independent of biological sex. Sixty-one functional magnetic resonance imaging studies (1,850 individuals) that presented erotic visual stimuli to men and women of different sexual orientation were identified. Coordinate-based activation likelihood estimation was used to conduct metaanalyses. Sensitivity and clustering analyses of averaged neuronal response patterns were performed to investigate robustness of the findings. In contrast to neutral stimuli, sexual pictures and videos induce significant activations in brain regions, including insula, middle occipital, anterior cingulate and fusiform gyrus, amygdala, striatum, pulvinar, and substantia nigra. Cluster analysis suggests stimulus type as the most, and biological sex as the least, predictor for classification. Contrast analysis further shows no significant sex-specific differences within groups. Systematic review of sex differences in gray matter volume of brain regions associated with sexual arousal (3,723 adults) did not show any causal relationship between structural features and functional response to visual sexual stimuli. The neural basis of sexual arousal in humans is associated with sexual orientation yet, contrary to the widely accepted view, is not different between women and men.

Here’s from a related article (translated from Dutch) based on the above research on NRC, “Female and male brains respond the same to sexual pictures” (July 17th 2019):

There is no difference in brain activity among men and women when they look at sexual photos and videos. During the first processing of visual sexual stimuli (by about ten different brain regions), male and female brains respond the same. This is evidenced by a meta-analysis of 61 brain scan studies, which looked at the response to sexual stimuli and to neutral videos and pictures, such as landscapes or sports competitions.

The research is based on brain scans done between 2001 and 2018 of a total of 1,850 test subjects who were watching pornography and neutral images in an fMRI, write the brain researchers of the Max Planck Institute in Tübingen, Germany, this week in the PNAS.

Always horny

Professor of Sexology Ellen Laan (Amsterdam UMC), who published the review work “Sex, life long learning” with Rik van Lunsen two years ago, is delighted by the new research. Laan: “This research shows once again that men and women are equal in terms of sexuality. Contrary to the popular notion that men are more sexual beings than women, you can see here that male and female brains respond equally strong to visual sexual stimuli. And yet, many gender stereotypes are still being held onto, says Laan. For example, that men are “naturally” always horny while women don’t easily get aroused.

But this equality is not only apparent from this neurological examination, explains Laan. “These conclusions are in line with my own PhD research and that of Erick Janssen from 25 years ago. It showed that the genitalia of men and women react in a similar way to visual sexual stimuli. And also in gender differences in sexual behavior, the differences between men and women appear to be small, according to meta-analysis, and moreover they decrease. In 1993, those differences were really greater than they are now in 2010. That is why we assume that gender differences in sexual expression between men and women do not have a biological basis, but indicate differences in individual development, which are culturally determined.”

Yes, it’s the sexual suppression brainwash (“cultural programming”) that women are exposed to started from early childhood that mentally castrates them and makes them appear to have a lower sex drive compared to men. Like I wrote in “Understanding Women Part V”:

So the truth is that men and normal women do not differ when it comes to their sexual desires. In fact, they have a very similar sex drive. Yes, surprise, surprise, men and women really are basically the same. All of us have the same basic needs as human beings. The differences we do see between men and women are due to the various issues and rules in society that influence women. And these are the root causes of all the (mental) issues women in general are exhibiting, which result in their difficult to understand behaviour, as discussed in the first part of this series.

Of course there’s a very important reason for why especially women are being mentally castrated starting from early childhood, and I discuss this in my posts “LGBT pride month: There is no pride in mental illness” and “Sexual Suppression and Repression I: Definition and Origin”.

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